You Are Here > Basketball-Reference.com > BBR Blog > NBA and College Basketball Analysis

SITE NEWS: We are moving all of our site and company news into a single blog for Sports-Reference.com. We'll tag all Basketball-Reference content, so you can quickly and easily find the content you want.

Also, our existing Basketball-Reference blog rss feed will be redirected to the new site's feed.

Basketball-Reference.com // Sports Reference

For more from Neil, check out his new work at BasketballProspectus.com.

Feature Watch: Player Comparison Finder

Posted by Neil Paine on September 1, 2009

This is a very cool feature that I think too often gets lost in the crowd of items on the Full Court page: the Player Comparison Finder. We all love to compare players and their stats, so this tool should naturally be right up everyone's alley... It allows you to select up to four players and compare their numbers either in a particular season (say, Cousy vs. Nash at age 30), or cumulatively through a certain season (KG vs. Dwight Howard through age 23, for instance). It also breaks down the statistical comparison in each of four ways that should be familiar to you already from our player and team pages: Totals, Per Game, Per 36 Minutes, and, of course, Advanced Stats. Now, as we all know, when making comparisons between players across widely disparate eras, context needs to be accounted for. But even so, I think it's still fun and useful to be able to isolate the players you want to compare and look at their numbers side-by-side on the same page.

ShareThis

One Response to “Feature Watch: Player Comparison Finder”

  1. Jason J Says:

    I love this feature, because it's a fast, easy way to examine a group of players in decent detail without having to set a lot of parameters. I have always wished we could make the age range more like on the Player Season finder page, though. It would be nice to be able to select a peak range of years or ages, so that if you wanted to compare Dwight or Kobe to someone over a range of seasons, you could drop their teenage years where they were still going through growing pains.