You Are Here > Basketball-Reference.com > BBR Blog > NBA and College Basketball Analysis

SITE NEWS: We are moving all of our site and company news into a single blog for Sports-Reference.com. We'll tag all Basketball-Reference content, so you can quickly and easily find the content you want.

Also, our existing Basketball-Reference blog rss feed will be redirected to the new site's feed.

Basketball-Reference.com // Sports Reference

For more from Neil, check out his new work at BasketballProspectus.com.

Layups: Apparently Hipsters Love Classic NBA Jerseys, Too

Posted by Neil Paine on September 20, 2010

In case you missed it, Sunday's New York Times featured a fashion & style story relevant to the basketball set, an Adam Wilson piece centering on 20-something hipsters whose outfits of choice include the jerseys of 1990s-era NBA players. A few of the players paid homage to on the streets of NYC:  Mark Price, Ed O'Bannon, Glen Rice, Isaiah Rider, Jerry Stackhouse, and Michael Jordan (#45 variety, naturally).

Of course, no discussion of ironic vintage NBA apparel would be complete without also acknowledging the legendary Straight Cash Homey Dot Net, who for more than three years has been posting a collection of the most ridiculous jerseys in captivity. The majority of the people in their photos lack the self-awareness about jersey selection that the East Village hipsters have, but then again, when you're sporting an Isaac Austin jersey, does the level of irony with which you wear it really matter?

ShareThis

9 Responses to “Layups: Apparently Hipsters Love Classic NBA Jerseys, Too”

  1. P Middy Says:

    Must they ruin everything?

  2. Neil Paine Says:

    In fairness, Ed O'Bannon's jersey was already ruined by virtue of belonging to Ed O'Bannon.

  3. RobertAugustdeMeijer Says:

    Oh, I'm not good at this, but which jerseys would be considered an exquisite choice by the nerds chics de la Reference-Basket?

  4. Neil Paine Says:

    Well, obviously Artis Gilmore...

  5. Greyberger Says:

    Perhaps James Donaldson's Mavs jersey, in honor of his improbably good '87 season?

    If the price of sponsoring their page is any indication, wearing Donaldson's jersey is three times more ironic than wearing a Detlef Schrempf Sonics jersey.

  6. Anon x 2 Says:

    Do want Sheed Hawks Jersey

  7. Jason J Says:

    Where can I get a classic Frank Brickowski babydoll-t?

  8. RobertAugustdeMeijer Says:

    Indeed, a Hawks Sheed jersey would be spectacular!

    Okay, I'm going to do try these three:
    -Grace, #31, Celtics, 1986
    -Ann, #3, Colonels, 1968
    -Iuzzolino, #53, Mavericks, 1992

  9. elliott Says:

    Give the Man His Due

    The other day following the Super bowl, I was researching NFL and NBA championship history. Baseball, MLB is not quite so muddled, fortunately. While researching NBA history and reviewing Lakers team history I ran across Lakers Retired uniform numbers again. This was not the first time. And, again a bit of sadness and dismay filled my heart; George Mikan’s uniform (jersey) number had not been retired by the Lakers Franchise. For us sports enthusiasts and basketball purists this is a must.
    When comparing the Lakers Franchise championships to the Boston Celtics Franchises, five of those championships were won by the team, while still in Minneapolis, MN, are included. Those teams were captained and/or led by none other than the man himself, Mr. George Mikan. He was the first and original dominant big man and player in the game. Dismiss the proper recognition of the contributions of the great players, then you must also omit or dismiss the fruits of their contributions.
    George Mikan played on five NBA, one BAA, and one NBL championship teams for the Minneapolis Lakers. Only Hall-of-Famers Kareem Abdul-Jabaar, and Ervin Magic Johnson; and current Lakers player Kobe Bryant won or played for as many NBA titles as he, none as many overall titles.
    He should have been the first, as we have it, he might be last. Mr. Jerry Buss if you are reading this please give the man his due and retire his number, it is long past overdue.

    Author
    Elliott O. Nicholson